No Knead Bread – first attempt

I noticed some years ago that dough was easier to knead if you mixed it to a rough dough and then let it relax for ten minutes. Having just tried cooking a no knead batter (see my previous post) I think I can see the reason for this – the water allows the gluten to start developing. I have some ideas on improving the knead-ability of this dough further, but this may have to wait for a few weeks.

A quick search of Amazon revealed the following books that I will try to review at some stage: –

First I thought I would mention the results of last night’s efforts.

Essentially, my first no-knead loaf came out too damp – I did not use the extended cooking time because it had not seemed to have risen too much. Since I did not have usable scales here and had just bought a new mixing bowl for the occasion, I had totally guessed the weights of the mixture. However the final result came out very much like English Crumpets, open textured, moist, tasty and chewy. We all thought it was delicious, so I am repeating the recipe here. I have bought scales and weighed the remaining flour to estimate how much flour I had used, but have no idea of how much water was used.

Ingredients

  • 375 grams flour (should be 500 grams)
  • water – sufficient to make a soft batter (should be 360 grams)
  • 10 grams salt (2 level teaspoons)
  • 1 gram fast use yeast (1 fifth of a level teaspoon)

Method

  1. Mix the yeast with the flour in a mixing bowl
  2. Dissolve 10 grams of salt into the water
  3. Stir the water into the flour, and beat it with a wooden spoon to remove as many of the flour lumps as possible
  4. Place clingfilm over the bowl (I left the wooden spoon in to save wasting dough)
  5. I beat the bubbles out of the bowl twice over the next 15 hours
  6. Pre-heat a tin in the oven to 220 degrees Centigrade
  7. After letting a new set of bubbles develop (at least an hour) pour the dough as gently as you can into the hot loaf tin
  8. Return the tin to the oven and cook for 35 – 45 minutes
  9. Can be cut whilst warm and spread with a butter to resemble English Crumpets